Wilderness and the Value of Doing Nothing

Dana blog

by Dana Johnson

 

Along the high-elevation, wind-swept ridges of the West, a long-lived, gnarly-branched pine is in trouble.  A species of stone pine known for its high stress tolerance and adaptability, whitebark pine is slow-growing and can live between 500 – 1,000 years.  Lacking wings for wind-dispersal, its calorie-dense seeds are spread primarily by Clark’s Nutcracker, a member of the crow family with a specialized bill for extracting large seeds from pinecones and a pouch under its tongue for stashing and carrying seeds long distance.  Those seeds are a prized food source for a range of species, including the imperiled grizzly bear. 

As tough as the species is, whitebark pine is facing mounting pressures from climate change, decades of fire suppression, blister rust, mountain pine beetles, and competing conifers migrating to higher elevations in response to warming temperatures.  Already found at high elevations, many worry that whitebark pine will have nowhere to run. 

This cocktail of stressors has landed whitebark pine on the short-list for federal listing under the Endangered Species Act.  Unfortunately, the proposed listing rule allows logging and other “forest management” activities in whitebark pine habitat, and is, per usual, loudly silent on actions that might address the underlying causes of global warming.  Instead, it focuses heavily on intervention and manipulation strategies—like selectively breeding and planting blister rust resistant trees, pruning and thinning stands, fighting back other migrating conifers with logging, applying insecticides and pheromones, and even wrapping pinecones in wire mesh to keep red squirrels and Clark’s nutcrackers from getting at the seeds.

This is a familiar story.  Humans are exceedingly bad at exercising restraint and simply not doing things.  Rather than drastically reducing consumption, travel, recreation, and development—things that take real personal and political sacrifice but create space for other species to exist—we put an enormous amount of effort into developing technologies that enable us to continue with business as usual or at least provide a veil of plausible deniability regarding our impact on the world.  Slap enough windmills on the hilltops, and we’ll never have to slow down.  Gather enough data on wildlife, and we can invade their space with abandon.  Or, worst case, fire up the helicopters, pluck the critters from their homes, slap tracking collars on their necks, and drop them elsewhere.  There is a deep tendency to treat everything as if it is merely an engineering challenge that is solvable with enough data and ingenuity (and money). 

This is not to say we shouldn’t pursue things less harmful than our current things—we’ve dug quite an overwhelming hole with climate change, and we need to be creative in how we deal with it.  But too often our efforts are tunnel-visioned on maintaining the status quo, and the tougher conversations about how we exist on this planet are altogether muted. 

Take for instance grizzly bears.  A widely cited research paper states that “[h]umans are the primary agent of death” for grizzlies.  We know this.  When humans and bears mix, bears end up dead.  So, areas with less human access and activity (e.g. recreation, logging, fast-moving cars and trains, etc.) are areas with fewer dead bears.  And in areas with greater human activity, we sorely need greater tolerance (and compassion) for bears.  As with so many other species reacting to rapidly changing conditions, we need to provide grizzlies with the space to move and adapt, and we need to keep open minds about what that might look like.  Yet, in the whitebark pine listing rule, the Fish and Wildlife Service downplays the importance of whitebark pine as a food for grizzlies calling them “opportunistic feeders.”  But whitebark pine is often found in remote, high elevation sites away from humans.  When whitebark pine seeds are scarce, bears search out other food, which often brings them into lower elevations and in closer contact with humans.  We don’t much care for the idea of sharing our favorite creek-side trail with a berry-munching grizzly or dealing with potholes in our golf courses from a bear digging up earthworms, so when an “opportunistic” bear ends up in our space, we trap the bear and move him back to his allotted “recovery zone.”  And if the bear crosses our line in the sand again—looking for food, or a mate, or a new home—we kill him, and we go to great pains gathering more data and rationalizing all the reasons why this is the way of things, why we don’t need to change our own behavior or ask, “What gives us the right?”

These tendencies toward control and entitlement make our collective agreement on Wilderness pretty remarkable.  Wilderness is a conscious reflection of human restraint—a place where we decided there is value in Nature’s own wild order, in the autonomy and freedom of the wild, and in allowing the land to play whatever hand it is dealt without our intentional interference.  It is a recognition that we don’t and can’t know everything and that we might learn something if we step back and observe what happens when we don’t impose our will.  Because of this, unsurprisingly, Wilderness is some of the best habitat left for species trying to eke out an existence alongside humans.  

The idea of Wilderness as a self-willed landscape has been a difficult one for land management agencies.  They have an ingrained history of modifying public lands to achieve “desired conditions,” an idea laden with value bias even in the best of times.  Throw climate change and all of its uncertainties into the mix, and the increasing urge to actively maintain static conditions becomes all the more problematic. 

Even though the agencies often resist it on the ground, their policy guidance reflects the value in Wilderness.  Agency guidance states, “Wilderness areas are living ecosystems in a constant state of evolution[,]” and “[i]t is not the intent of wilderness stewardship to arrest this evolution in an attempt to preserve character existing” at some prior time.  And, “A key descriptor of wilderness in the Wilderness Act, untrammeled refers to the freedom of a landscape from the human intent to permanently intervene, alter, control, or manipulate natural conditions or processes.”  And, “Maintaining wilderness character requires an attitude of humility and restraint. We preserve wilderness character by … imposing limits on ourselves.”  In Wilderness, we “[p]rovide an environment where the forces of natural selection and survival rather than human actions determine which and what numbers of wildlife species will exist.” 

Agency policy is taking a notable turn.  One agency stated its “policy prior to climate change was to take a ‘hands-off’ approach where overt human influences were not the primary reasons for population fluctuations.”  It now believes its role is shifting to  adaptive management to maintain “natural conditions,” and this conversation is growing across the agencies.  This—at its core—is a conversation about whether we will allow Wilderness to persist into the future. 

This shift is reflected in the proposed whitebark pine rule.  It lists Wilderness under “Challenges to Restoration,” setting the stage for conflict between an imperiled species and an imperiled landscape.  But this is likely a false conflict.  Roughly 29 percent of whitebark pine habitat is in Wilderness.  Given the variables and unintended consequences inherent in manipulations, that 29 percent should be set aside as an important baseline for comparison to our tinkerings elsewhere.  The listing rule acknowledges “a high degree of uncertainty inherent in any predictions of species responses to a variety of climate change scenarios. This is particularly true for whitebark pine given it is very long lived, has a widespread distribution, has complex interactions with other competitor tree species, relies on Clark’s nutcracker for both distribution and regeneration, and has significant threats present from disease, predation, and fire.”

It also acknowledges “[t]here is no known way to control, reduce, or eliminate either mountain pine beetle or white pine blister rust…particularly at the landscape scale needed to effectively conserve this species.”  In fact, “the vast scale at which planting rust-resistant trees would need to occur, long timeframes in which restoration efficacy could be assessed, and limited funding and resources, will make it challenging to restore whitebark pine throughout its range. One estimate indicates that if planting continues at its current pace, it would take over 5000 years to cover just 5 percent of the range of whitebark pine[.]”

This does not appear to be a scenario where we have to grapple with fine lines.  There is no discrete, human-caused disruption in Wilderness that can be corrected with a discrete, short-lived intervention.  This is not an errant patch of spotted knapweed along a stock trail that can be pulled.  But it is illustrative of the moral and ethical questions coming our way.  Climate change will continue to cause vast changes in the world as we know it, and we will see more attempts to mitigate the effects through ongoing, counterbalancing manipulations.  The question will be whether we lose Wilderness in the process. 

------------------

Dana Johnson is the staff attorney for Wilderness Watch, a national wilderness conservation organization headquartered in Missoula, MT, www.wildernessswatch.org.

 

Big Whitebark Keith Hammer


Photo: Keith Hammer

Wilderness Experienced—Floating the Grand Canyon
 

Comments 77

Guest - james peek on Monday, 10 May 2021 13:44

I don’t have any problem with most of Rob’s comments and agree the IR wolf inbreeding was primarily responsible for their decline. That is in peer-reviewed publications. But in that case, at least one wolf crossed Lake Superior after the inbreeding was documented but didn’t have an effect on the population as best we know. So that is a tough call either way. Now Idaho is going to try to reduce the wolf population to the minimum 150 which would have to include control in wilderness areas. Law specifies that wolves won’t be “managed” in wilderness except through hunting/trapping regulations. So once again, we will see litigation if someone decides to reduce wolves in wilderness. Already there has been a case against someone who illegally killed a wolf in wilderness that was successfully pursued. There will always be efforts to alter wilderness values and that is why WW is important to resist them. I don’t always agree with their approach, but so what? Best, jimp

I don’t have any problem with most of Rob’s comments and agree the IR wolf inbreeding was primarily responsible for their decline. That is in peer-reviewed publications. But in that case, at least one wolf crossed Lake Superior after the inbreeding was documented but didn’t have an effect on the population as best we know. So that is a tough call either way. Now Idaho is going to try to reduce the wolf population to the minimum 150 which would have to include control in wilderness areas. Law specifies that wolves won’t be “managed” in wilderness except through hunting/trapping regulations. So once again, we will see litigation if someone decides to reduce wolves in wilderness. Already there has been a case against someone who illegally killed a wolf in wilderness that was successfully pursued. There will always be efforts to alter wilderness values and that is why WW is important to resist them. I don’t always agree with their approach, but so what? Best, jimp
Guest - Gertrud Firmage on Saturday, 08 May 2021 07:52

You've spoken from my mind and heart. Thank you so very much for your so valuable visions.

You've spoken from my mind and heart. Thank you so very much for your so valuable visions.
Guest - lonna richmond on Thursday, 06 May 2021 11:02

thank you dana, for a beautiful and heartfelt article.

thank you dana, for a beautiful and heartfelt article.
Guest - Dallas E. on Thursday, 06 May 2021 09:35

Society needs to start with educating children at a young school age to appreciate all life on Earth.
New programs in schools on how to love animals and preserve the entire ecosystem by doing this.

Society needs to start with educating children at a young school age to appreciate all life on Earth. New programs in schools on how to love animals and preserve the entire ecosystem by doing this.
Guest - Adella Albiani on Thursday, 06 May 2021 06:59

Thanks for this perspective. I agree 100%. I often have said this," If all the animals disappeared off the planet, mankind would suffer. But if all of mankind disappeared, the animals would through a party." Humans do have to stop trying to fix things they really don't understand.

Thanks for this perspective. I agree 100%. I often have said this," If all the animals disappeared off the planet, mankind would suffer. But if all of mankind disappeared, the animals would through a party." Humans do have to stop trying to fix things they really don't understand.
Guest - Steve matthews on Wednesday, 05 May 2021 17:18

UNTIL THE DAY I DIE WITH every blink of my Eyes I will PLEAD AND I WILL CRY OUT TO ALL THE ARCHANGELS of GOD TO END THE SUFFERING OF ALL THE ANIMALS OF PLANET earth!!!

UNTIL THE DAY I DIE WITH every blink of my Eyes I will PLEAD AND I WILL CRY OUT TO ALL THE ARCHANGELS of GOD TO END THE SUFFERING OF ALL THE ANIMALS OF PLANET earth!!!
Guest - Terri Clai Pigford on Monday, 10 May 2021 12:39

I feel exactly the same way you do. Thank you.

I feel exactly the same way you do. Thank you.
Guest - TERRENCE GEORGE BROWN on Thursday, 06 May 2021 02:35

So will I!

So will I!
Guest - Dallas E. on Thursday, 06 May 2021 09:55

Myself as well.

Myself as well.
Guest - Dwight on Wednesday, 05 May 2021 14:03

The author explicitly speaks for me. The only robust wilderness is that in which man does not interfere.

The author explicitly speaks for me. The only robust wilderness is that in which man does not interfere.
Guest - Mathew V. on Wednesday, 05 May 2021 13:03

Beautifully and succinctly articulated.

Beautifully and succinctly articulated.
Guest - Simeon Hahn on Wednesday, 05 May 2021 12:41

Excellent! We need more lawyers that think like Dana!

Excellent! We need more lawyers that think like Dana!
Guest - Johanna Schwarzer on Wednesday, 05 May 2021 12:35

Translated from German:
We humans must finally understand that on this planet and in its nature all living beings have a right to live. Humans take the animals' food and their habitats and hardly leave them a place of retreat, because either more and more buildings are built into nature or useful animals are allowed to graze further and further into the wilderness. The result is that more and more nature / wilderness is disappearing and more and more wild animals are being mercilessly and ruthlessly killed. Humans have only borrowed this planet and have to deal responsibly with nature and its resources. We have already used up a large part of these resources ignorantly and irresponsibly. If we continue to treat nature in such a shameful manner, it will no longer provide us with food and we will have no way of being able to continue living on this earth. The planet doesn't need us humans - we just need the planet. That is why every country must prioritize in such a way that nature is protected and biodiversity in both flora and fauna is increased. This also includes all types of wildlife.

Wir Menschen müssen endlich begreifen, dass auf diesem Planeten und in seiner Natur alle Lebewesen ein Recht zu leben haben. Der Mensch nimmt den Tieren die Nahrung und ihre Habitate und lässt ihnen kaum Rückzugsorte, weil entweder immer weiter in die Natur gebaut wird oder aber Nutz Tiere immer weiter in die Wildnis zum Grasen gelassen werden. Das Ergebnis ist, dass immer mehr Natur/Wildnis verschwindet und immer mehr Wild Tiere gnadenlos und rücksichtslos getötet werden. Menschen haben diesen Planeten nur geliehen und müssen mit der Natur und ihren Ressourcen verantwortungsvoll umgehen. Einen großen Teil dieser Ressourcen haben wir bereits ignorant und verantwortungslos verbraucht. Wenn wir weiterhin so schändlich mit der Natur umgehen, wird diese uns keine Nahrung mehr liefern und wir haben keine Möglichkeit, dann auf dieser Erde auch weiterhin leben zu können. Der Planet braucht uns Menschen nicht - wir jedoch den Planeten. Deshalb muss jedes Land die Priorität so setzen, dass die Natur geschützt und die Artenvielfalt sowohl in Flora, als auch in der Fauna, vermehrt wird. Dazu gehören auch alle Arten von Wildtieren.

Translated from German: We humans must finally understand that on this planet and in its nature all living beings have a right to live. Humans take the animals' food and their habitats and hardly leave them a place of retreat, because either more and more buildings are built into nature or useful animals are allowed to graze further and further into the wilderness. The result is that more and more nature / wilderness is disappearing and more and more wild animals are being mercilessly and ruthlessly killed. Humans have only borrowed this planet and have to deal responsibly with nature and its resources. We have already used up a large part of these resources ignorantly and irresponsibly. If we continue to treat nature in such a shameful manner, it will no longer provide us with food and we will have no way of being able to continue living on this earth. The planet doesn't need us humans - we just need the planet. That is why every country must prioritize in such a way that nature is protected and biodiversity in both flora and fauna is increased. This also includes all types of wildlife. Wir Menschen müssen endlich begreifen, dass auf diesem Planeten und in seiner Natur alle Lebewesen ein Recht zu leben haben. Der Mensch nimmt den Tieren die Nahrung und ihre Habitate und lässt ihnen kaum Rückzugsorte, weil entweder immer weiter in die Natur gebaut wird oder aber Nutz Tiere immer weiter in die Wildnis zum Grasen gelassen werden. Das Ergebnis ist, dass immer mehr Natur/Wildnis verschwindet und immer mehr Wild Tiere gnadenlos und rücksichtslos getötet werden. Menschen haben diesen Planeten nur geliehen und müssen mit der Natur und ihren Ressourcen verantwortungsvoll umgehen. Einen großen Teil dieser Ressourcen haben wir bereits ignorant und verantwortungslos verbraucht. Wenn wir weiterhin so schändlich mit der Natur umgehen, wird diese uns keine Nahrung mehr liefern und wir haben keine Möglichkeit, dann auf dieser Erde auch weiterhin leben zu können. Der Planet braucht uns Menschen nicht - wir jedoch den Planeten. Deshalb muss jedes Land die Priorität so setzen, dass die Natur geschützt und die Artenvielfalt sowohl in Flora, als auch in der Fauna, vermehrt wird. Dazu gehören auch alle Arten von Wildtieren.
Guest - Veda Joy on Wednesday, 05 May 2021 12:20

Veda Joy Thank you for your article. It's a shame that the wilderness and animals suffer because of human intervention. Thank you for your beautiful article.

Veda Joy Thank you for your article. It's a shame that the wilderness and animals suffer because of human intervention. Thank you for your beautiful article.
Guest - Kathleen Smith on Wednesday, 05 May 2021 12:11

Bravo! and beautifully written.

Bravo! and beautifully written.
Guest - Peter Ayres on Wednesday, 05 May 2021 12:05

I have to agree, we, as humans have to be patient and respectful and let wilderness do it's job of being habitat, filtering water, providing food sources for what lives in the habitat and keep to areas that humans can congregate safely and not interfere in the natural process. Let Wilderness do what it does best.
I really dislike that the animals take the blame for their interactions with humans. We can't afford that thinking anymore.
Where does wilderness Watch stand on this thought process compared to Sierra Club, NRDC, EarthWatch, EDF, WWF, and other environmental groups I can't think of at the moment? Are you the thorn in their side, or do you work together and support each other?
thanks

I have to agree, we, as humans have to be patient and respectful and let wilderness do it's job of being habitat, filtering water, providing food sources for what lives in the habitat and keep to areas that humans can congregate safely and not interfere in the natural process. Let Wilderness do what it does best. I really dislike that the animals take the blame for their interactions with humans. We can't afford that thinking anymore. Where does wilderness Watch stand on this thought process compared to Sierra Club, NRDC, EarthWatch, EDF, WWF, and other environmental groups I can't think of at the moment? Are you the thorn in their side, or do you work together and support each other? thanks
Guest - Wilderness Watch on Friday, 07 May 2021 15:23

Wilderness Watch is currently engaged with other groups on both litigation and other efforts to protect Wilderness. We work with a number of other groups in defense of Wilderness as issues arise and as appropriate, but we never compromise in defense of the Wilderness Act and our Wilderness System. Our first concern is always to protect Wilderness.

Wilderness Watch is currently engaged with other groups on both litigation and other efforts to protect Wilderness. We work with a number of other groups in defense of Wilderness as issues arise and as appropriate, but we never compromise in defense of the Wilderness Act and our Wilderness System. Our first concern is always to protect Wilderness.
Guest - Dallas E. on Thursday, 06 May 2021 09:59

Good point, why do we not see a 'force for change', instead of scattered groups trying to implement change? We need an amalgamation of voices to be heard by deaf governments and uncaring citizens.

Good point, why do we not see a 'force for change', instead of scattered groups trying to implement change? We need an amalgamation of voices to be heard by deaf governments and uncaring citizens.
Guest - Richard Mazzuca on Wednesday, 05 May 2021 11:53

Thank you Dana.
I believe your message is clear, robust and important.
The message is (in my experience) about an awareness that may not be well understood.
Now, the challenge is to convey the seminal concept of your message, AND make it meaningful to an audience far broader than those of us who are already involved in Wilderness respect.
Methinks there is a large population that requires deeper understanding.

I'm not certain how to accomplish that, however we, as concerned citizens, need to grab people's attention, create focus and promote actionable behaviors.

In any event, I will do my best to promote consciousness that results in action. Regular messages to our elected officials is one method, alongside grassroots community action.
Thank you, Dana for taking the time to communicate.

Thank you Dana. I believe your message is clear, robust and important. The message is (in my experience) about an awareness that may not be well understood. Now, the challenge is to convey the seminal concept of your message, AND make it meaningful to an audience far broader than those of us who are already involved in Wilderness respect. Methinks there is a large population that requires deeper understanding. I'm not certain how to accomplish that, however we, as concerned citizens, need to grab people's attention, create focus and promote actionable behaviors. In any event, I will do my best to promote consciousness that results in action. Regular messages to our elected officials is one method, alongside grassroots community action. Thank you, Dana for taking the time to communicate.
Guest - Terri Clai Pigford (website) on Wednesday, 05 May 2021 10:56

It is just so unfair how and why animals are killed. I believe animals have a right to be here as well as human beings. But through human ego, selfishness, consumption, greed, profit, ignorance and unwillingness to appreciate animal life some animals are just doomed to death. People just don't see the beauty and worth of animals. These grizzly bears, here, mean no harm to humans they are just looking to survive, so they will venture out of their territory if it means finding a food source. I wish people could realize animals have their own families to care for, protect and share their live's with, and when an animal is killed that is an animal's family member dead. When you push animals out of their own habitat what do you expect, you have destroyed their survival in all aspects of their way of living. Animals will forever be killed, abused and pushed out of the way. It despairs me how people treat and kill off animals. So sorry for the bears.

It is just so unfair how and why animals are killed. I believe animals have a right to be here as well as human beings. But through human ego, selfishness, consumption, greed, profit, ignorance and unwillingness to appreciate animal life some animals are just doomed to death. People just don't see the beauty and worth of animals. These grizzly bears, here, mean no harm to humans they are just looking to survive, so they will venture out of their territory if it means finding a food source. I wish people could realize animals have their own families to care for, protect and share their live's with, and when an animal is killed that is an animal's family member dead. When you push animals out of their own habitat what do you expect, you have destroyed their survival in all aspects of their way of living. Animals will forever be killed, abused and pushed out of the way. It despairs me how people treat and kill off animals. So sorry for the bears.
Already Registered? Login Here
Guest
Monday, 17 May 2021

By accepting you will be accessing a service provided by a third-party external to https://wildernesswatch.org/

Contact Us

Wilderness Watch
P.O. Box 9175
Missoula, MT 59807
P: 406-542-2048
E: wild@wildernesswatch.org

Minneapolis, MN Office
2833 43rd Avenue South
Minneapolis, MN 55406

P: 612-201-9266

Moscow, ID Office
P.O. Box 9765
Moscow, ID 83843

Stay Connected

flogo RGB HEX 512   Twitter Logo gold   Insta gold

Search

Go to top