Toads in the sand: How the Juniper Dunes Wilderness protects wildlife from motorized wreckreation

By Scott Crain

Scott

The Juniper Dunes Wilderness area is a 7000-acre part of the National Wilderness Preservation System, located in southeastern Washington State. It lies just a few miles north of what used to be a quiet part of the state, now exploding with population and development. The Hanford Nuclear Reservation lies a few miles to the southwest, one of the most polluted nuclear waste sites in the country. Just outside the barbed wire fence that surrounds Juniper Dunes lies an off-road vehicle area promoted by the Bureau of Land Management for ORVs and other motorized activities. 

 

I was born and raised a few miles south in Pasco. When I was a kid, the Dunes, as we called them, were a place to go target shooting, driving four wheelers, and doing all sorts of other things that our parents didn't want to know about. I've moved on, but those activities continue unabated right up to the wilderness boundary.

 

Right after the pandemic hit and leaving your house became socially acceptable, my family took a beeline straight to the Wilderness to spend two nights in the desert. You haul all your water in. There are no trails and no established camps. And, unless you have an ORV, you need to hike at least a mile through the off-road vehicle trails to come near the boundary.

 

We climbed over the barbed wire to enter the Wilderness and found a large swale to shield some of the ORV and target shooting noise where we set our tent up. From the top of the dune above us we could see ORVs drive right up to the fence, and roar down the dunes with multicolored LED lights flashing on their fenders and roll bars. 

 

We headed north for lunch to a large dune far off in the middle of the wilderness. While the kids played in the sand, I laid in the sage and napped. My older child eventually shouted, "Dad, I found a toad buried in the dune." As usual, he spotted wildlife no one else saw, and as usual, I didn't believe him at first. I should know better by now, but I looked and in his hand was sitting a spadefoot toad that had buried itself in the dunes. He gently set it back in the dune and covered it up again.

 

I wondered the rest of the day how many toads I'd walked over unseen in these dunes, and how many find the wilderness a refuge from the constant churning created by the ORVs outside the fence. It gave us a respect for the dunes and how we treat them in the future.

 

I've been on both sides of that fence now, and I definitely know which I prefer and which is sustainable for our planet and our health in the long run.


 

Juniper Dunes Wilderness

 


Scott is a lawyer for a nonprofit law firm serving low-income people in Washington. He lives in Seattle.

 

 

Editor's note:

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Comments 51

Guest - Thomas H Small on Thursday, 15 October 2020 15:41

i believe society should protect the sand dunes in Washington State

i believe society should protect the sand dunes in Washington State
Guest - Barbara Letsom on Thursday, 15 October 2020 15:19

Let those motorized vehicles run on their own private lands - NOT OURS!

Let those motorized vehicles run on their own private lands - NOT OURS!
Guest - Bill Lundeen on Thursday, 15 October 2020 15:08

Thank you, Scott, for your story! I enjoyed it alot, and it helped me realize how open land, quiet nature, clean air all add to our mental and physical health as we seek ways to provide good family time. I, too, believe we need less motorized and more human-powered places to re-create.

Thank you, Scott, for your story! I enjoyed it alot, and it helped me realize how open land, quiet nature, clean air all add to our mental and physical health as we seek ways to provide good family time. I, too, believe we need less motorized and more human-powered places to re-create.
Guest - Michael Lee on Thursday, 15 October 2020 14:57

Please prioritize the environment and wildlife over human recreation wishes.

Please prioritize the environment and wildlife over human recreation wishes.
Guest - Stephan Donovan on Thursday, 15 October 2020 14:52

Stop being selfish. Protect Nature. No vehicles ever.

Stop being selfish. Protect Nature. No vehicles ever.
Guest - Michelle Setaro on Thursday, 15 October 2020 14:46

Veganism. Respect our fellow Earthlings and their homes. Humans have no right to take everything from those we SHARE the Earth with.

Veganism. Respect our fellow Earthlings and their homes. Humans have no right to take everything from those we SHARE the Earth with.
Guest - Wally Elton on Thursday, 15 October 2020 14:45

That BLM promotes ORV use right outside a Wilderness area is part of why most BLM land should be transferred to a real conservation agency.

That BLM promotes ORV use right outside a Wilderness area is part of why most BLM land should be transferred to a real conservation agency.
Guest - Anonymous on Thursday, 15 October 2020 14:44

Juniper Dunes Wilderness

Please take steps to protect the spadefoot toad and wildlife from motorized wreckreation on these Dunes!

Thank you for your consideration,

Juniper Dunes Wilderness Please take steps to protect the spadefoot toad and wildlife from motorized wreckreation on these Dunes! Thank you for your consideration,
Guest - Karen Stanton on Thursday, 15 October 2020 14:43

I wish more of the folks who venture outdoors would leave the bigger, badder, faster, noise machines behind and find the small, simple, amazing treasures that nature has to offer. A frog or a four-wheeler? The choice couldn't be plainer to me.

I wish more of the folks who venture outdoors would leave the bigger, badder, faster, noise machines behind and find the small, simple, amazing treasures that nature has to offer. A frog or a four-wheeler? The choice couldn't be plainer to me.
Guest - Loisann Sciarrillo on Thursday, 15 October 2020 14:41

Please look out for other wilderness animals.

Please look out for other wilderness animals.
Guest - Shirley K Furnari on Thursday, 15 October 2020 14:32

It's past time we look after the other living inhabitants of this world, instead of our selfish quest for recreation that affects wildlife in THEIR environment, disturbing the ecosystem

It's past time we look after the other living inhabitants of this world, instead of our selfish quest for recreation that affects wildlife in THEIR environment, disturbing the ecosystem
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Sunday, 25 October 2020

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