What is Wilderness Without its Wolves?

Franz 200x150

What is Wilderness Without its Wolves?

By Franz Camenzind

 

For millennia, wolves have occupied nearly all the lands now designated as Wilderness in the western US, with the exception of coastal California. Yet today, fewer than two score of the approximately 540 Wildernesses west of the 100th meridian (not including Alaska’s 48) can claim some number of wolves as residents and only a dozen or so harbor wolves in numbers sufficient to be considered sustainable—in either the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem, Central Idaho Wildlands or Montana’s Northern Continental Divide Ecosystem. Arguably, the long-term sustainability of wolves in other Wilderness areas is at risk due to the limited security provided by those smaller, often isolated landscapes.

The Wilderness Act defines Wilderness as a place where the earth and its community of life are untrammeled by humankind, retains its primeval character and where natural conditions are preserved. Simply stated, Wilderness is meant to exist with minimal human interference. Yet within the vast majority of Wilderness areas, the wolf, the apex species with profound ecosystem influence, is now absent—an absence due entirely to the relentless killing by humankind.

We need look no farther than Yellowstone National Park to witness the influence wolves have on an ecosystem. The park’s wolves were exterminated by the early 1900s, ostensibly to protect the park’s favored elk herds. What followed was not surprising—an overabundance of elk which led to deleterious impacts to vegetation, particularly lower elevation riparian and willow communities.

Since the reintroduction of wolves to the park in the mid-1990s, elk numbers have dropped to levels most ecologists agree resemble something near carrying capacity. Similarly, park wolf numbers stabilized around 100, after initial highs of 150-170. With the wolf’s return, the park ecosystem is showing signs of reaching a dynamic equilibrium beneficial to all components. It’s not an exaggeration to say that wolves were instrumental in returning the park’s wildlands nearer to their primeval conditions.

Wolves hold apex status, in part, because of their far-ranging hunting behavior. Yellowstone-area wolf packs hunt in territories ranging from 185-310 square miles. Besides being smaller, the Yellowstone elk herd is more dispersed and spends less time in the lower elevation meadows and riparian-willow communities.

Most ecologists agree that the wolf’s collective impact on elk is contributing to the resurgence of the willow communities, which in turn is witnessing an increase in avian biodiversity and density. The revitalization of Yellowstone’s northern range willow communities has also enabled an increase in the beaver population, leading to positive changes to stream ecology, thus benefitting aquatic invertebrates and the fisheries. 

Many of the ecological changes brought about by the wolf’s return may take years if not decades to recognize and fully understand. But one thing is clear, today’s Yellowstone and the Wildernesses harboring robust wolf populations more closely resemble their primeval character than those lacking wolves. Wolves may just be nature’s best wilderness stewards.

Three states now account for the majority of the west’s wolves: Idaho (1,556), Montana (1,220) and Wyoming (347). Another 351 are tallied for Washington (178) and Oregon (173). Mexican Gray Wolves occur in two states: New Mexico (114) and Arizona (72). Combined, approximately 3,660 wolves currently reside west of the 100th meridian—a number that pales to the 250,000 to 2 million estimated to have resided in the entire United States before the European invasion. However, the current numbers are better than the few dozen residing in northwest Montana three decades ago, which were a result of wolves immigrating from Canada. 

Today’s bad news is that wolves in Idaho and Montana are once again facing the vigilante actions of the 1800s. Both state legislatures recently passed draconian legislation with the stated objective of reducing wolf numbers to near 150—the number at which the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) will take over wolf management as per the states’ wolf management agreements in effect since Endangered Species Act protections were taken away from wolves.

The new legislation authorizes the state commissions to allow wolf-killing by pretty much any means imaginable: the use of traps and snares, unlimited quotas, extended hunting and trapping seasons, and in Idaho, night time hunting, aerial gunning and killing pups in dens. Idaho also designated $200,000 dollars to “cover expenses incurred” by private individuals while killing wolves—essentially imposing a bounty on wolves.

Idaho’s and Montana’s aggressive wolf-killing legislation has been temporarily dampened a bit by the states’ wildlife commissions which have some leeway when setting annual wolf hunting and trapping regulations. For instance, this season, Montana is limiting the open-ended quotas written into their legislation. But the intent and goals remain unchanged—it may just take a few more years to achieve those goals. Ironically, that means more wolves will be killed because each year the survivors will produce young, thus replenishing their numbers, resulting in “a need” to kill more wolves to reach the 150 goal. 

State wildlife agencies manage wolves by the numbers, ignoring the fact that wolves are one of the most social species on the planet, and function and survive not as individuals, but as members of highly structured packs. Consequently, intense, random killing can cause packs to break up, resulting in diminished hunting efficiency and pushing wolves toward easier prey, such as livestock.

Today, wolves and the wilderness ecosystems they inhabit are imminently threatened by these irresponsible state efforts to kill upwards of 90 percent of their wolf populations, including within Wilderness. A weakened or removed apex species inevitably results in a weakened ecological system. If this barbaric killing is allowed to proceed, ecosystem function and wilderness protection will be pushed back decades.

Wilderness Watch continues to fight for Wilderness and its wolves. On December 6, Wilderness Watch and a dozen allies filed a lawsuit and a motion for a temporary restraining order/preliminary injunction against the State of Idaho over its barbaric new wolf-killing laws. This followed a June 2021 Notice of Intent to sue Idaho and Montana for their new anti-wolf statues. We’ve petitioned the US Department of Agriculture to promulgate rules or issue closure orders preventing certain killing methods, hired killers, and paying bounties in Wilderness. Wilderness Watch also joined a petition authored by Western Watersheds Project to relist wolves under the Endangered Species Act in light of the new, aggressive wolf-killing statutes. In response, the US Fish and Wildlife Service announced that it will undertake a status review of the gray wolf over the next 12 months.

 

A Wilderness denied of its wolves is a wounded Wilderness. If wolves can’t be allowed live in Wilderness, where can they live? Wilderness Watch will continue to do all it can to protect this critical, symbiotic relationship and the ecological integrity of Wilderness itself.

 

Franz Camenzind is a wildlife biologist turned filmmaker and environmental activist who recently retired from the WW Board after serving 6 years.

 

Wolf

Secretary Haaland and the Izembek Refuge
Hulahula River Pingo
 

Comments 107

Guest - Mary Ann Tober on Tuesday, 21 December 2021 16:06

Please protect wolves.

Please protect wolves.
Guest - Cliff Ballard on Tuesday, 21 December 2021 15:39

I've written to various persons involved in the killing of wolves in the State of Washington, including the Governor. I've had a total of one response, not the Governor. At one recent point, 29 of 34 wolves killed in Washington State were at the request of one livestock owner. One may wonder why one livestock owner is showed such favoritism. I don't wonder much.

I've written to various persons involved in the killing of wolves in the State of Washington, including the Governor. I've had a total of one response, not the Governor. At one recent point, 29 of 34 wolves killed in Washington State were at the request of one livestock owner. One may wonder why one livestock owner is showed such favoritism. I don't wonder much.
Guest - Mark B. on Tuesday, 21 December 2021 15:28

It all comes down to the fact that the residents of the wolf thrill-kill states want to get rid of their wolves. They elect to the state legislatures like-minded individuals who are the ones who then vote to rev up the wolf-killing machine. There is no answer except to continue supporting wolf reintroduction and natural migration into the neighboring wolf-friendly states to the west. Or restart the long and arduous process of protecting the wolves under the Endangered Species Act. But even if successful, it will be overturned again by the next administration. The good citizens of Idaho, Montana and Wyoming will never change their views on this issue which gives so many of us angst.

It all comes down to the fact that the residents of the wolf thrill-kill states want to get rid of their wolves. They elect to the state legislatures like-minded individuals who are the ones who then vote to rev up the wolf-killing machine. There is no answer except to continue supporting wolf reintroduction and natural migration into the neighboring wolf-friendly states to the west. Or restart the long and arduous process of protecting the wolves under the Endangered Species Act. But even if successful, it will be overturned again by the next administration. The good citizens of Idaho, Montana and Wyoming will never change their views on this issue which gives so many of us angst.
Guest - Annie Bien on Tuesday, 21 December 2021 15:22

The Wolf and the Border

I do not know map lines.

I do not know I’m considered a Big Bad Wolf,
never met Little Red Riding Hood,
never ate a grandmother,
never put on a bonnet
to trick a little girl,
never had a gravelly voice,
never knew I was naturally bad.

I do not know stereotypes.

The man who shot his mother,
Raped his daughter,
Beat his wife,
The woman who shot her father,
Beat her husband,
Raped her son,
government officials who encouraged
human beings to determine we are naturally bad
allowed those with weapons
to put on red riding hoods,
white hoods, blood hoods,
strap on automatic weapons,
toss meat across an imaginary line
justify riddling us with bullets
unaware of the testimony of scientists.

I am a keystone animal,
capable of saving majestic purple mountains
But I don’t speak in words.

They call themselves humane. A lion
With a mane, fell on the ground because
Someone wanted to take his head home
To put on a wall. A giraffe collapsed
A broken tent of legs and neck broken
For a woman’s birthday dream
To use an automatic weapon to repeatedly
Puncture life as the triumph of Tarzan’s Jane.
This is the nature of being the offspring
Of many Red Riding Hoods.

In the land of gunshots,
I watch as others howl under moonlight.

The Wolf and the Border I do not know map lines. I do not know I’m considered a Big Bad Wolf, never met Little Red Riding Hood, never ate a grandmother, never put on a bonnet to trick a little girl, never had a gravelly voice, never knew I was naturally bad. I do not know stereotypes. The man who shot his mother, Raped his daughter, Beat his wife, The woman who shot her father, Beat her husband, Raped her son, government officials who encouraged human beings to determine we are naturally bad allowed those with weapons to put on red riding hoods, white hoods, blood hoods, strap on automatic weapons, toss meat across an imaginary line justify riddling us with bullets unaware of the testimony of scientists. I am a keystone animal, capable of saving majestic purple mountains But I don’t speak in words. They call themselves humane. A lion With a mane, fell on the ground because Someone wanted to take his head home To put on a wall. A giraffe collapsed A broken tent of legs and neck broken For a woman’s birthday dream To use an automatic weapon to repeatedly Puncture life as the triumph of Tarzan’s Jane. This is the nature of being the offspring Of many Red Riding Hoods. In the land of gunshots, I watch as others howl under moonlight.
Guest - Nançi Cox on Tuesday, 21 December 2021 15:18

We can not allow the federal government to slaughter wolves whenever they want to. Wolves are vital Apex predators.

We can not allow the federal government to slaughter wolves whenever they want to. Wolves are vital Apex predators.
Guest - Dennis Paradee on Tuesday, 21 December 2021 14:57

Man continues to be the weak link connecting wolves with their natural environment. Hopefully the link won’t break and result in the extermination and extinction of this magnificent animal.

Man continues to be the weak link connecting wolves with their natural environment. Hopefully the link won’t break and result in the extermination and extinction of this magnificent animal.
Guest - Harry Blumenthal on Tuesday, 21 December 2021 14:52

I am so sickened by the States that are encouraging the killing of American’s iconic Wolves. How did this come about?
It’s true that some Wolves have taken farmers animals from time to time. But Environmental Groups have offered to pay for their loss. The over reaction by a group of states involves a love of killing in the makeup of the people killing our Wolves whenever they see one and ones not taking an animal from a rancher.
This beautiful and amazing animal is one of America’s most loved by Americans.
Killers are Human’s who ‘hate’ and have no idea of the value of Wolves to their whole ecosystems!

I am so sickened by the States that are encouraging the killing of American’s iconic Wolves. How did this come about? It’s true that some Wolves have taken farmers animals from time to time. But Environmental Groups have offered to pay for their loss. The over reaction by a group of states involves a love of killing in the makeup of the people killing our Wolves whenever they see one and ones not taking an animal from a rancher. This beautiful and amazing animal is one of America’s most loved by Americans. Killers are Human’s who ‘hate’ and have no idea of the value of Wolves to their whole ecosystems!
Guest - Anne Carey Colorado on Tuesday, 21 December 2021 14:49

Thank you for all that you do to help protect the wolf population in this county.
Wolves are magnificent creatures who deserve to be protected and threated with respect.

Thank you for all that you do to help protect the wolf population in this county. Wolves are magnificent creatures who deserve to be protected and threated with respect.
Guest - jennie lederer on Tuesday, 21 December 2021 14:46

Hello
I cannot believe what is happening to our wild animals that have no say in any of the horrible things happening. The wolves are a very important part of the wilderness and have great meaning to me and my sister who passed away. I wanted to donate to help you save them and while it is not much I believe every little bit helps...can you tell me how to donate to your organization...thank you

Hello I cannot believe what is happening to our wild animals that have no say in any of the horrible things happening. The wolves are a very important part of the wilderness and have great meaning to me and my sister who passed away. I wanted to donate to help you save them and while it is not much I believe every little bit helps...can you tell me how to donate to your organization...thank you
Guest - Mary on Tuesday, 21 December 2021 14:45

Sign the petitions to stop the wolf carnage, email your Dept. of Fish and Game, email the Dept. of the Interior, DONATE money to organizations like the Center for Biological Diversity and others who have legal teams to stop the anti-wolf legislations. A Comment is not enough, folks. TAKE ACTION. As humans how many more species do we need to kill off before we really kill ourselves and our future?

Sign the petitions to stop the wolf carnage, email your Dept. of Fish and Game, email the Dept. of the Interior, DONATE money to organizations like the Center for Biological Diversity and others who have legal teams to stop the anti-wolf legislations. A Comment is not enough, folks. TAKE ACTION. As humans how many more species do we need to kill off before we really kill ourselves and our future?
Guest - Rayline Dean on Tuesday, 21 December 2021 14:35

Please seeing that the wolves are protected from any hunter, any trapper & snares, etc. Wolves really don't deserve to be hunted. I've been concerned that the wolves may be existed that will be the worst because seeing the wolves is truly the most beautiful creature. Wolves are truly precious for every generation to see. PLEASE see that they are protected from being hunters, trappers & snares, etc. Remember the wolves are created by our Heavenly Father. He created them for us to see how beauty they are. Breathtaking, when watching so beautiful wolves from afar & photos & videos, too.

Please seeing that the wolves are protected from any hunter, any trapper & snares, etc. Wolves really don't deserve to be hunted. I've been concerned that the wolves may be existed that will be the worst because seeing the wolves is truly the most beautiful creature. Wolves are truly precious for every generation to see. PLEASE see that they are protected from being hunters, trappers & snares, etc. Remember the wolves are created by our Heavenly Father. He created them for us to see how beauty they are. Breathtaking, when watching so beautiful wolves from afar & photos & videos, too.
Guest - Marcus Gottlieb (website) on Tuesday, 21 December 2021 14:11

Save the wolves!!

Save the wolves!!
Guest - Susanne Kiriaty on Tuesday, 21 December 2021 14:03

We need the *WOLVES* for our *ECOSYSTEM* to stay healthy! When we kill them we kill our environment!

We need the *WOLVES* for our *ECOSYSTEM* to stay healthy! When we kill them we kill our environment!
Guest - Lore on Tuesday, 21 December 2021 14:01

Stop the trapping and killing of these important predators. There are ways to co-exist and allow the wolves to live with ranches. So much of our country's land is set aside for cattle. Wildlife like wolves should be allowed to roam freely as they cannot live on tiny bits of land. They are needed in our ecosystems. Stop managing our lands for the ranchers and provide for our wildlife!

Stop the trapping and killing of these important predators. There are ways to co-exist and allow the wolves to live with ranches. So much of our country's land is set aside for cattle. Wildlife like wolves should be allowed to roam freely as they cannot live on tiny bits of land. They are needed in our ecosystems. Stop managing our lands for the ranchers and provide for our wildlife!
Guest - Richard Bold on Tuesday, 21 December 2021 13:58

Make sure to read all the comments imploring you to protect wolves in the wilderness. I couldn't add anything that hasn't already been expressed other than emphasize Do the Right Thing. You know what that is.

Make sure to read all the comments imploring you to protect wolves in the wilderness. I couldn't add anything that hasn't already been expressed other than emphasize Do the Right Thing. You know what that is.
Guest - . Daniel O’Brien on Tuesday, 21 December 2021 12:52

Wolves are the top predators of North America and wherever else they live and they must not be killed because we need to keep ecosystems in balance and without them everything would die including us so we must shut down all of the trophy hunting for them as well as not destroy their habitats.

Wolves are the top predators of North America and wherever else they live and they must not be killed because we need to keep ecosystems in balance and without them everything would die including us so we must shut down all of the trophy hunting for them as well as not destroy their habitats.
Guest - Jeannelle Navas on Tuesday, 21 December 2021 13:19

Where are the nature reserves? Can we trap a pack and move them to safe lands?

Where are the nature reserves? Can we trap a pack and move them to safe lands?
Guest - Charleen Strelke on Tuesday, 21 December 2021 12:30

Wolves are an important animal on this earth. All animals are important and deserve to be protected. In Massachusetts, people wiped out the wolf population and now we have an overpopulation of deer that wolves use to keep in balance. Now, we have hunting seasons to keep deer populations down, the job that wolves use to do. Trapping and poisoning wildlife should be banned because it is cruel and not necessary. Wildlife and nature was designed to balance their food chain, they have been doing it for hundreds of years. When man gets involved they mess it up and cause more harm than good.

Wolves are an important animal on this earth. All animals are important and deserve to be protected. In Massachusetts, people wiped out the wolf population and now we have an overpopulation of deer that wolves use to keep in balance. Now, we have hunting seasons to keep deer populations down, the job that wolves use to do. Trapping and poisoning wildlife should be banned because it is cruel and not necessary. Wildlife and nature was designed to balance their food chain, they have been doing it for hundreds of years. When man gets involved they mess it up and cause more harm than good.
Guest - Kathleeno Kelcey on Tuesday, 21 December 2021 12:24

Thank you for this insightful and intelligent article.

Thank you for this insightful and intelligent article.
Guest - Jeffrey Long on Tuesday, 21 December 2021 12:24

Dr. Franz Camenzin, thanks for sharing some facts on wolves. It seems so clear how important this genus is for the health of riparian ecology. I hope their numbers and distribution can reach a broader balance for our wildernesses.

Dr. Franz Camenzin, thanks for sharing some facts on wolves. It seems so clear how important this genus is for the health of riparian ecology. I hope their numbers and distribution can reach a broader balance for our wildernesses.
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