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QuoteWILDERNESS WATCH is America’s only organization dedicated to defending and keeping wild the nation’s 110 million-acre National Wilderness Preservation System. Our work is guided by the visionary 1964 Wilderness Act.

Wilderness Watch believes that wilderness is defined by two primary characteristics. First, it is a place where nature is free to exist as it did in ages past, self-willed and untrammeled. Second, it is a place where humans are free to roam through nature in its wild condition, to experience a feeling of solitude and self-reliance found nowhere else.

For 25 years, Wilderness Watch has confronted threats to wildness and solitude, such as helicopters and all-terrain vehicles; bulldozers and chainsaws; illegal buildings, commercial intrusions and other developments; predator control and other exploitation of native wildlife; excessive horse-packing and other livestock-related damage; and many other incursions that degrade wilderness. We educate, engage and encourage citizens and government agencies to stand up for our nation’s strong and unique wilderness heritage.

Please join us in ensuring that America's Wilderness remains full of mystery, adventure, and biological wealth.

“It is painfully clear to me…that a private, citizen’s organization is necessary if the spirit and letter of this landmark law [the Wilderness Act] is to be observed… I wholeheartedly offer my name and energy to your splendid efforts.” —Former Secretary of the Interior, Stewart Udall, upon joining the Wilderness Watch board of directors


BLOG: Keeping Wilderness WILD!

It's time to change how we administer Wilderness and strengthen the National Wilderness Preservation System
by Brett Haverstick

Jerome WalkerTaking a long trip into the backcountry during winter doesn’t appeal to some people. That’s understandable. But I enjoy it, and it’s something I try to do a few times a year. Winter backpacking is very different, and more challenging, compared to strapping on the pack during other seasons.

For one it’s darn cold, with many trips never getting above freezing, day or night...My recent trip into the Frank Church-River of No Return Wilderness was with a friend, and, perhaps more importantly, an individual with a skill set that I could trust and depend on.

Read the rest...

 

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